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Airy:  Spaciousness, often a pleasant mostly treble-based reverb sound.  Extended frequency response that runs up through the top end of the bandwidth.

 

Brittle:  Peaking in high-frequencies, weak fundamentals with slightly distorted or harsh highs.

 

Crisp:  Good high-frequency response with good transient quality

 

Crispy:  Constant, but perhaps random high frequency sounds not unlike frying foods.

 

Delicate: Extended high frequency range without being harsh.  Emphasis on high frequencies extending to 20 KHz, but without the peaking. 

 

Edgy:  High frequency emphasis from about 3.5 to 6 KHz with harmonic content overly strong in comparison to fundamentals.  Can deal with high frequency distortion and rasp.

 

Piercing:  Hard on the ears, screechy and sharp.  Narrow peaks occurring between 3 and 10 KHz.

 

Raspy:  Harsh sounds in the 6 KHz range that sounds like a scratchy voice.

 

Sibilant:  S and Sh sounds are overly emphasized. 

 

Sizzly:  Similar to crisp, like the sound of the decay on a riveted cymbal.

 

Steely or Shiny:  Lots of top end from 3-6 KHz with peaky highs (as opposed to flat but boosted top end)

 

Sweet:  Flat high-frequency response without distortion and extended the full bandwidth.  


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2 Responses to “Common Terms in the High Frequencies, part 14”

  1. John says:

    Keep ’em comin’, sir. I’m lapping them up.

  2. Phil says:

    Glad to know that this stuff is appreciated by some out there! If you or anybody else out there in Internetland can think of any other terms that get thrown around in the music biz and you’d like someone to riff on it for a while, try and derive a precise meaning, rant about, and maybe offer some possible solutions let me know!

    Drop me a line or post it right here in the blog. Thanks!

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